Our Christmas wish is to stop breast cancer. Will you help us? With your support today, Breast Cancer Now’s scientists could develop drugs to stop secondary breast cancer ever developing.

My name’s Jodi and, like thousands of women like me, I have just one wish this Christmas: to stop breast cancer taking women away from the people we love.

I was only 25 when I found out I had breast cancer.

After giving birth to my beautiful boy, my chest was incredibly painful. I lost a lot of weight and was tired all the time. I found a lump in my breast. My very first thought was ‘will I be around to see my son’s first Christmas?’

The doctors confirmed it was breast cancer and I was told I needed an urgent double mastectomy.

After this gruelling operation, the doctors told me I’d need chemotherapy and I burst into tears. I couldn’t bear the thought of not being able to spend my son’s first Christmas at home.

Thankfully, the doctors agreed to postpone my first round of treatment, so that I could spend Christmas day with my baby. Chemo started two days later. Each round left me hospitalised for five days. I was exhausted and in almost constant pain. But the hardest part was not being able to spend time with my son.

This Christmas is going to be a good one. I’m surrounded by family and friends and there are no signs of my cancer. I know I’m one of the lucky ones. But I live in fear that my breast cancer will return and spread.

Breast cancer can return at any time, even after treatment – it’s impossible to predict and can happen to anyone. Once it returns, it can also spread outside the breast to other parts of the body. This is what’s known as secondary breast cancer, and it’s currently incurable. It’s the diagnosis that women like me dread.

We urgently need to fund new research so that a secondary breast cancer diagnosis is no longer a death sentence.

That’s why I support Breast Cancer Now – they believe that if we all act now, by 2050 everyone who develops breast cancer will live.

With your support today, Breast Cancer Now’s scientists could develop drugs to stop secondary breast cancer ever developing.

Donate now

Read about Dr Paul Shore's research into finding ways to stop breast cancer spreading.