This is Giles. Three men in his family have had breast cancer, he’s counting on research to find out why.

While breast cancer is largely a female disease, breast cancer does affect men. One of those men is Giles.

“My father died from breast cancer in 2004 and, six months later, my uncle was diagnosed and he died four years later when the cancer returned. And then two years ago, I developed it,” explains Giles.

“Even for women who develop breast cancer the chances of it being because of a family history of the disease is actually pretty rare. But for two men in one family to get breast cancer, let alone three, is unheard of.”

I have a son and a daughter and I want a future where they don’t have to worry about breast cancer.

Giles

“Around 350 men a year develop breast cancer, but that’s still 350 lives. Research is key is to making sure that anyone who gets breast cancer, whether it’s a man or a woman, survives. I have a son and a daughter and I want a future where they don’t have to worry about breast cancer”.

Our research

Our Male Breast Cancer Study gathers data from over 2,000 men, to better understand how to prevent and treat breast cancer in men.



 

We’re already making incredible strides in understanding breast cancer risk and prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment for both men and women. But there’s still much more to be done so we can save lives.

Join us and help support vital research into breast cancer

If we all act now, we believe that by 2050 everyone who develops breast cancer will live but we need to invest at least £300 million in research over the next 10 years.

Donate now