Breast Cancer Now and the leading journal, Breast Cancer Research, are excited to announce the winners of our first joint image competition. We hope that you enjoy them!

Friday 27 May 2016      Research blog
Immunofluorescence category winner and overall winner – Victoria Cookson, Postdoctoral Research Associate at The University of Sheffield, UK

Immunofluorescence category winner and overall winner – Victoria Cookson, Postdoctoral Research Associate at The University of Sheffield, UK

Back in February, we launched our first Breast Cancer Research Image Competition and asked researchers all over the world to share their stunning science snaps.

Now the winners are in! A big thank you to all those who entered from across the globe.

The Breast Cancer Now Scientific Advisory Board were given the tough task of selecting the winners and below you can see their picks.

For more background on the winning images, look out for further “Behind the image” posts from Breast Cancer Research on the On Medicine blog.

Histopathology category winner – Sarah Boyle, Postdoctoral Research Officer at the Centre for Cancer Biology, Adelaide, Australia

Histopathology category winner – Sarah Boyle, Postdoctoral Research Officer at the Centre for Cancer Biology, Adelaide, Australia

Title: Imaging mouse mammary hyperplasia

Fast growing cells are seen in the ducts of a mouse mammary gland. The growth of mammary tumours in mice gives researchers a tool to study the development of breast cancer in way that mimics the disease in humans. To make this image, incredibly thin slices of a mouse mammary gland were spread on a glass slide, and stained in a dye called carmine alum. The whole slide was then photographed using a dissection microscope which illuminates the sample.

Computer modelling category winner – Edward P Carter, Postdoctoral Research Assistant at Barts Cancer Institute, London, UK

Computer modelling category winner – Edward P Carter, Postdoctoral Research Assistant at Barts Cancer Institute, London, UK

Title: Boob in a tube

This is a 3D model of the milk duct in the breast. It was developed using healthy human breast duct cells from the Breast Cancer Now Tissue Bank. Cell centres (nuclei) are labelled in blue; the inner cells of the duct are luminal cells labelled in green; and the outer cells labelled in red are myoepithelial cells. The white scale is 10 nanometres across or 0.00000001 metres. Creating models like this can help researchers spot the difference in molecules present within healthy and cancerous breast cells.

Other images category winner – James C McConnell, Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester, UK

Other images category winner – James C McConnell, Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester, UK

Title: Collagen ultrastructure in high mammographic density breast tissue

This image shows the surface of a breast tissue sample showing bundles of collagen in someone with high breast density. It was creating using a technique called atomic force microscopy (AFM) which can create incredibly high resolution images on a nano scale. The map measures 150 × 150 nanometres (0.00000015 metres), and the process of scanning this area took 16 hours. Large collagen fibres can be seen connected to the surrounding tissue by a network of fine fibrils (150–450 nm diameter), and such fibres were not seen in matched samples of low density breast tissue.

Immunofluorescence category winner and overall winner – Victoria Cookson, Postdoctoral Research Associate at The University of Sheffield, UK

Immunofluorescence category winner and overall winner – Victoria Cookson, Postdoctoral Research Associate at The University of Sheffield, UK

Title: A spheroid generated from a 3D culture of fluorescently labelled MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

A 3D sphere grown in the lab from a type of breast cancer cell called MDA-MB-231. Fluorescent tags have been applied to show cells (green), their nuclei (blue), and a molecule called siRNA (red). siRNA can be used to “switch off” certain genes to see how cancer cells operate without them – a vital tool in understanding how breast cancer cells grow and finding new ways to target them with drugs.

All images have been released under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY), so can be shared freely, while attributing the image author.


 

About the author

Katie Goates is a Senior Research Communications Officer at Breast Cancer Now.

Finding inspiration whilst working in a cancer centre, she completed a Masters in Science Communication and is passionate about explaining how research is moving knowledge and treatment forward.

The Research Communications team keeps our supporters and the public up to date with the exciting progress our scientists are making against breast cancer, as well as research news from around the world.