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Our B-Aware breast awareness campaign is launched in Scotland

Breast Cancer Care Scotland is launching a high profile campaign aimed at promoting early detection of breast cancer in targeted communities and improving survival rates across the country.

Breast Cancer Care Scotland is launching a high profile campaign aimed at promoting early detection of breast cancer in targeted communities and improving survival rates across the country.

The three year campaign is being supported by Chris Weir who also becomes Breast Cancer Care Scotland's first Breast Health Awareness Ambassador. She is donating £250000 in each year of the campaign’s life.

Called B-Aware the campaign has been developed in response to research showing that the breast cancer incidence rate in Scotland has increased by 14% in the past decade while cancer survival rates in Scotland are one of the lowest in Europe. It is recognised that the sooner breast cancer is diagnosed the more effective treatment can be.

The new breast awareness programme will create a team of trained volunteers called Team B-Aware recruited from around Scotland. Team B-Aware will reach hard-to-reach groups in their local communities where prompt detection rates may be poor. This includes women and men with learning difficulties learning disabilities mental health issues and people from black and ethnic minority and socially disadvantaged communities.

The volunteers’ role will be to spread the breast awareness message break down barriers and dispel the myths associated with breast cancer. It’s hoped that the programme will encourage more people to come forward as soon as they have a symptom or suspect something is wrong thus aiming to improve survival rates.

Team B-Aware volunteers will be fully supported by Breast Cancer Care's Breast Health Promotion Team in a structured ‘Train the Trainer’ course devised specifically for Scotland.

Join team B-Aware

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Team B-Aware

Speaking as the campaign launched Chris Weir said:

'In my career I saw at first-hand the challenges many people confront when accessing and dealing with information that the rest of us take for granted. For example in relation to breast cancer people with learning difficulties face barriers such as trouble understanding breast awareness messages written information is not always appropriate or accessible they may be relying on carers and health professionals to support them the need to inform them may not be taken seriously issues around capacity and informed consent or they are simply overlooked.

'But breast cancer doesn’t discriminate. When Breast Cancer Care Scotland talked to me about the low survival rates here and I realised that this situation was even worse for hard-to-reach groups I immediately agreed to support their campaign. I am also proud to be their first Breast Health Awareness Ambassador in Scotland and look forward to working with the team in the next three years.'

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