Dr Klaus Pors and his PhD student are investigating how to unlock the potential of chemotherapy drugs known as duocarmycins, which could provide a new, more effective treatment option for people with breast cancer – especially those whose cancer has returned or spread.

 

Professor Richard Grose will study two types of cells involved in the progression of DCIS to invasive breast cancer. Understanding them better would help to predict which patients with DCIS will need treatment to stop invasive breast cancer developing.

Dr Timothy Humphrey is studying DNA modifications present in breast cancers, which could play a role in helping tumours to grow. His work could lead to new ways of treating breast cancers and ultimately save lives.

Dr John Maher is developing a new type of immunotherapy for breast cancer. In this project he is improving a CAR-T cell therapy so that it’s effective against breast cancer cells but doesn’t attack non-cancer cells, ensuring that the treatment is safe for testing in patients.

We need better ways to track how secondary tumours in the bone respond to treatments. Professor Gary Cook is investigating whether a ‘tracer’ molecule can tell if these treatments are working at an earlier stage than is currently possible – and help patients live well for longer.

People with ER positive breast cancer can be prescribed anti-hormone treatment for five years or more to reduce the risk of recurrence, but many find it hard to complete the course. Dr Hughes’ team are developing a way to help people persist with their treatment.