Breast cancer can trick our immune system into ignoring it, which can cause cancer cells to grow and spread. Professor Damian Mole’s team is studying one possible way tumours do this, so we can develop new treatments to improve the chances of survival for people with breast cancer.

In the future, breast screening could be adapted to a woman’s personal risk of developing breast cancer, which could change how regularly women are screened. Dr Jo Waller will investigate the concerns women have about this to ensure these approaches are effective.

Mrs Jane Macaskill is investigating whether measuring breast density using mammograms can be an effective way to tell if hormone therapy is working to stop breast cancer from returning, as early as possible. 

Professor Ian Kunkler is investigating the impact that an additional, targeted booster dose of radiotherapy has on preventing DCIS from returning and developing into invasive breast cancer, and the effects it has on breast appearance and quality of life.

Dr Nora Pashayan would like to find the best way to personalise the breast screening programme, adjusting screening timing and frequency according to a woman’s individual risk, in order to maximise the benefits and minimise the potential harms of screening.

Dr Seth Coffelt is investigating how a specific type of white blood cell can help breast cancer to spread throughout the body. His work could lead to new ways to prevent the spread of breast cancer, and ultimately stop people dying from the disease.