Professor Nicholas Turner is testing if combining a drug palbociclib together with the immunotherapy drug avelumab is safe and could be used to successfully treat a sub-type of triple negative breast cancer.

Breast cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for some breast cancers developing resistance to treatment, and may cause breast cancer to spread. Dr Paloma Garcia wants to find out more about how we can target these cells to stop breast cancer spreading.

Miss Karina Cox is investigating whether a special ultrasound method can help specialists find out if breast cancer has spread to the lymph nodes in the armpit.

There are currently few targeted treatments available for triple negative breast cancer. In addition, it can be more aggressive than other breast cancers. We need to understand what makes triple negative breast cancer different from other forms of the disease to develop new effective targeted treatments for patients.

Mrs Jane Macaskill is investigating whether measuring breast density using mammograms can be an effective way to tell if hormone therapy is working to stop breast cancer from returning, as early as possible. 

Breast cancer that has spread to the brain can be particularly hard to treat and severely affects people’s quality of life. Walk the Walk Fellow Dr Damir Varešlija is looking at how gene switches in breast cancer cells might make them more likely to spread to the brain and hopes to find ways to stop this from happening.