We need to develop our understanding of how breast cancer spreads around the body if we want to prevent deaths from the disease. Dr Iain Macpherson is studying the role of glutamate in breast cancer and will see if blocking it could prevent secondary breast cancer.

Dr Robert Falconer is developing a new form of chemotherapy, which could only kill cancer cells, leaving healthy cells intact. If this project is successful, it could save lives and lead to more people living beyond breast cancer.

 

Dr Klaus Pors and his PhD student are investigating how to unlock the potential of chemotherapy drugs known as duocarmycins, which could provide a new, more effective treatment option for people with breast cancer – especially those whose cancer has returned or spread.

 

We need better ways to track how secondary tumours in the bone respond to treatments. Professor Gary Cook is investigating whether a ‘tracer’ molecule can tell if these treatments are working at an earlier stage than is currently possible – and help patients live well for longer.

Professor Nicholas Turner and Dr Alicia Okines will lead a clinical trial of the drug crizotinib for patients with lobular breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This trial, called the ROLO study, could lead to a much-needed new treatment for this type of breast cancer.