For almost two decades, Amanda has worked tirelessly in so many areas of Breast Cancer Now. She gives us an insight into her work and imagines what it would look like condensed into a day. 

Amanda, a slim white woman with short grey hair, smiles while standing with her arm around Becs, a young blonde woman

Becs’ enthusiasm is what keeps me motivated  

My name is Amanda, and I’m a fundraiser and supporter of Breast Cancer Now. I have been working alongside the charity for 19 years, following the death of my youngest child, Becs.  

It is her courage and joy for life which will always drive me to make the most of where I have lived and worked – from the far northwest Highlands of Scotland to the south of France – and to live fully the amazing experiences which supporting research into breast cancer have given me. 

I wanted to show people what my involvement with the charity looks like, so I’ve condensed it all down into what it would look like as if it happened in just one day. 

I am involved in many facets of Breast Cancer Now 

So, here I am, starting the day by writing this blog. Blogs are a wonderful outlet for everyone to see what is being said and done by, and for, the charity. They give an opening for anyone to join in discussions, tell their story, learn of the latest developments in research into breast cancer and in the early diagnosis of it.  

Then, I join a Zoom meeting about the Generations Study, with which I have been involved since its inception. In this meeting, we go over encouraging developments and give people a chance to ask questions about how the study is progressing. Soon, the amazing participants of this study will be hearing more about what we’ve been doing.  

Feeling very buoyed up by that meeting, I go into another Zoom call to give an induction talk to the latest, and warmly welcomed, intake of staff members. It is always so interesting to hear how and why they came to Breast Cancer Now.  

Even after only a week or two, each one has become part of the ethos and aims of Breast Cancer Now and they all comment on how welcome they have been made to feel by their different teams. 

I am so grateful that the charity gives me a way to remember my daughter 

Now I have seen such an enthusiastic part of the charity’s future, I imagine a post-pandemic face-to-face meeting with the Humanising Health Care team. This work endeavors to involve patients and service users in healthcare education, in the hopes that healthcare providers will be better at their jobs.  

I am involved in interviewing candidates, and I have positive expectations for everyone involved. 

After this, I spend some very special time with the team who are organising the annual Becs James Award in memory of my beautiful, brave daughter.  

I can never thank the charity’s CEO, Delyth Morgan, and all the staff enough for the enthusiasm and commitment to this each year. It is such an honour for me to read all the proposals from so many teams as to who should be the year’s winner.  

Very kindly, the final choice and presentation of the award is mine and I am so proud to have Becs remembered, with love, by everyone at Breast Cancer Now. 

Becs, a white woman with dark blonde hair, stands at the seaside wearing a red windbreaker

I am grateful to anyone who gives their time to Breast Cancer Now 

By this time, in my fictional day, I must wait until the next time to continue yet more of the aspects of Breast Cancer Now with which I am involved.  

In my home life, as it were, I remember that two of my grandsons are turning 21 and 18, and I must do presents and cards. I also have a walk on the Common with friends (at a pace suitable for my recent heart intervention), a French gathering, a book group and an Italian revision Zoom. 

So, for a while, I will turn off my computer and say many thanks to YOU for reading my image of some of the aspects of Breast Cancer Now which are part of my life, and I send my very best wishes to you all. 

 

Breast Cancer Voices