PUBLISHED ON: 1 April 2021

Ruth took up running during lockdown last year, and wanted to use her new hobby to do something good. So, she ran her own personal marathon for Breast Cancer Now. 

Ruth running along a path while her daughter holds up a Breast Cancer Now flag

I was overwhelmed by support 

During the first lockdown, I started running and found that it benefitted me so much as time went on. I also became aware of the impact that coronavirus was having on breast cancer, and wanted to do something about it. 

Breast Cancer Now is a charity close to my heart, so I decided to challenge myself and joined the £1,000 challenge to try and raise some much-needed funds for secondary breast cancer research. 

My challenge was to run a marathon on my own around the lanes of North Oxfordshire. I shared my story through Instagram and Facebook, and was overwhelmed by the support of friends, family, work colleagues and associates. 

I think giving a positive message was something everyone bought into and breast cancer is unfortunately an illness that too many people have close connections with. I found the support through donations incredible. 

There were challenges, but I overcame them 

Getting to the start line was a challenge in itself. I was ill for a few weeks, which prevented me from training. Then my close family all got covid, so we had to self-isolate and I couldn't run on the day I planned. 

I found a new date but the night before, the roads flooded! 

However, on Christmas Eve I set out. It was cold but beautiful. 

The second half of the route was still flooded, so I had to change my route mid race, which meant more hills. I kept reminding myself that all of these challenges were nothing like the challenges people affected by breast cancer face. 

I ended up completing the marathon in three hours 36 minutes, and raised over £3,500 for Breast Cancer Now!

Determination is key 

It was amazing to do something positive in such a challenging time. What I’ve learned from doing it is that life will always bring challenges, but you should never give up hope. Keep being determined, and you will overcome them. 

If you're considering joining the £1,000 challenge, do it. You won't be disappointed. It will benefit not only you, but those close to you and people affected by breast cancer. 

 

If you'd like to have a go at the £1,000 challenge, there's still time to join in. Whether you want to run, walk, bake, or something completely different, we'd love to have you onboard.

Join the challenge